Sharad Sharma Nathan Mpangala Nathan Mpangala

Cultures continually change: everywhere in the world, new images evolve that are formed by individual backgrounds and new influences. This special focuses on the way cartoonists view their own culture. Three cartoonists interpret changing cultural expressions in their cities.

See what is slowly changing: cartoonists about changing culture

Slum culture! Rough images or texts that could never be insulting decorated the exterior of the normally-crammed buses in Nairobi. 'Pump up your ride' was the motto, with the sound all the way up. Some called it fantastic contemporary art. Others considered it noise pollution in the city. Fact, however, is that the government decided two years ago that all matatus had to remove their decorations. All buses had to be recognisable by their peaceful white colour and a yellow stripe. Neat and proper was the motto. Another fact: youth culture disappeared from the streets of Nairobi.

Cultures continually change. That is true now and was true in the past. The icons of our era can be seen everywhere: Tupac in Kenya, David Beckham in Jakarta, Jacky Chan in London. From a bird's eye view it is one giant melting pot. Today's world is changing at high speed due to globalisation, government policy, commerce and the media. And everywhere in the world, new images evolve that are formed by individual backgrounds and new influences.

This special focuses on the view of cartoonists. How do they see the changing cultural expressions in the cities where they live? Are they flooded in a negative sense by the external images? Or do they welcome every change?
Can they explain how the streets are changing? How do they interpret change? We asked these questions to three cartoonists, from Mexico, Tanzania and India.

Els van der Plas (director Prince Claus Fund) explains her view of the role played by humour and satire.
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More information about what is happening in the world of cartoons and development.
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This special for De Kracht van cultuur was made by Butterfly Works in cooperation with Peter Vlam